Sunday, May 11, 2014

Moved to different blog host, whew!!!

After suffering major attacks on our Wordpress blog site, we shut it down as the login attempts were crashing our server for all of our web sites.  I have been busy transferring to blog-spot which is hosted by Google and should be better able to ward off hacker intrusions.  This also separates the blog from our own web server and email server.....

I'll be adding in all the photos and other stuff we had over the next few days!

Bear with us, thanks for viewing and visiting!

Cheers,
Marc & Jerene

Saturday, April 5, 2014

Wildlife at Kelly Place

Red Fox seen at Kelly Place
We are frequently asked about the wild animals that may be encountered around Kelly Place. It is canyon country and there are a number of animals which have not been frightened off by the humans.

The most notable is undoubtedly the mountain lion. In our ten years on the property, we have never seen one here. HOWEVER, we frequently see evidence that they are around, and not on the fringes either. Sometimes their footprints are right outside our home. When I spoke to the Colorado Wildlife official about the danger, he told me that this is a “good mountain lion” because it doesn’t kill our pets and has stayed out of sight of humans. If they were to move our good mountain lion, it would open up the territory to another which may not be so good.

So we live with the mountain lions. We are observant of the correct way to behave if ever we do encounter one. That is to make yourself look large (holding a jacket or shirt over your head) and unusual. I thought I would sing the Star Spangled Banner. But never turn your back and run away. They are cats and if you act like a mouse, they will chase you. That’s why most mountain lion attacks are on runners or bicyclists. There have been no attacks on people in this area.

People frequently ask about snakes. We have no poisonous snakes in our property. There are rattlesnakes in the area, but they don’t seem to make it to us. We do have bull snakes (aka gopher snakes) which can get pretty big. They also can pretend to be rattlesnakes! One morning I found three of our cats surrounding a dry bush and there was a rattling inside the bush. It was a small bull snake rattling the dry leaves to try to scare the cats away. The cats just got bored eventually and left.

We also have small snakes such as garter snakes, but I rarely see snakes in the summer and, of course, never in cold weather.

Other reptiles include the beautiful collared lizard, which is frequently photographed preening for the camera (more likely for a mate). There are plenty of small striped lizards. It turns out that these are all female and reproduce by parthenogenesis!

Returning to the mammalian population-- We have skunks, raccoons, red and gray fox, and ring-tailed cat. Occasionally a coyote visits. I have seen a bobcat in the canyon, but not here. Mule deer are frequent visitors. They love our flowers and young plants. Last year we had a group of yellow-bellied marmots in the rocks easily seen from below. Some guests thought they were mountain lions because they couldn’t judge the size. It was obvious, though, when they stood on their hind legs (the marmots, not the guests).

Ring-tail Cat, enjoying our grapes.


We don’t have prairie dogs this side of the creek, but there are plenty of rock squirrels. It’s amazing to see them scurry straight up a rock wall. They are too smart. Marc saw one trying to open the lever-style doorknob on the office door. They did manage to open a push-button lock on a plastic container filled with bird seed. Now we keep our bird and cat food in a container with a carabiner lock. Squirrels don’t have thumbs.


Cute Kitty Visits!
Of course—the birds! Marc tries to keep the bird feeders filled, but it isn’t easy. We have a list of nearly a hundred species of birds sighted on the property. This list is posted on a bulletin board by the front door. We encourage new additions.

We have seen white-winged doves come in and take over territory from the mourning doves. Sometimes people think they are owls because they don’t recognize the sound of the doves cooing. We have three types of hummingbirds: rufous, black-chinned and broad-tailed. They carom around the courtyard from feeder to feeder. Sometimes one gets confused and tries to feed from a decorative light or guest’s ear! A scrub jay just arrived to munch on some cat food. There are Bullock’s oriole, hummingbird, and Say’s phoebe nests that I have seen in the trees. The white-throated swifts’ mud nests under rock overhangs remind us that they constructed the first cliff dwellings.

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Free Things to Do in the Four Corners: NE Arizona and NW New Mexico

For more free things to do, check out the blog posts for Colorado and Utah.

Three of the Four Corners belong mostly to the Navajo Nation: Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. Both Arizona and New Mexico have sites that are known for the presence of Ancestral Puebloan ruins: Canyon de Chelly (pronounced "shay") in Arizona and Chaco Canyon in New Mexico.

Canyon de Chelly is located on Navajo land and Navajo people still live and farm in the Canyon. A tour of the Canyon floor, led by Navajo guides, will cost money, but the road which loops around the Canyon offers spectacular views of cliff-dweller ruins and beautiful rock formations. There are overlooks from both the north and the south rims. The history of the Navajos in Canyon de Chelly is both fascinating and sad. When Kit Carson was charged with "rounding up" all Navajos and leading them on the Long Walk to what was almost a concentration camp in Texas, some Navajos were able to avoid being captured and continue living in this area using their knowledge of the land. I recommend reading up on the history of this area in conjunction with your visit. Knowledge of past events will enrich your experience visiting the Canyon.

Going further west, you can't miss the Glen Canyon Dam and beautiful Lake Powell. The visitor's center in Page offers an amazing view of this massive dam and the lake it formed. Lake Powell, in the Glen Canyon Recreation Area, is such an unusual body of water, with innumerable small fingers and tiny crevices to explore. You can pay for tours or houseboats, or you can bring your own kayak and explore independently.

Closer to the Arizona corner, lies Shiprock, the Navajo town and the rock formation. Although the formation was named because of it's similarity to a large sailing ship, the Native Americans see it differently--as the spread wing of an eagle with the rest of the bird underground. You can drive up to Shiprock, but the most intriguing view (featured on a National Geographic Magazine cover) is from a road which heads over the Lukachukai Mountain pass (towards the north rim of Canyon de Chelly). Shiprock is actually a volcanic vent and there is a ridge of shorter volcanic vents terminating at the larger formation. Including the ridge of vents in your photo of Shiprock gives a wonderful perspective shot.

In New Mexico, Chaco Canyon National Monument has a small fee to enter, so, although it is definitely worth exploring, it can't be included here. However, west of Chaco, just south of Bloomfield is a bizarre lunar landscape--Bisti Wilderness. From the parking area, some walking is required to get to the incredible hoodoos, petrified logs, and mounds of the strangest rock formations. You can climb all over these to find geologic treasures and really stretch your imagination with your camera. No facilities at this desert wonderland, so bring food and water for hours of exploration.